Chapter 319: Nagasaki Sanno Shrine (山王神社)

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The Camphor trees at Sanno Shrine were once thought to have died during the blast of the Nagasaki atomic bomb, it lost its leaves and the upper branches were destroyed but, miraculously it started to grow new again and remained a strong part of Nagasaki’s history. It’s almost poetic and I felt a sense of emotion run through me. Even the trees refused to give up and continued living. It’s definitely worth the visit. It’s about half an hour walk from Nagasaki Station, and about a 10 minute walk from Urakami Station.

—Tofu

4 thoughts on “Chapter 319: Nagasaki Sanno Shrine (山王神社)

  1. The surviving trees of Sannō Shrine have become another living demonstration of destruction and re-growth. Two large camphor trees were scorched, burned and stripped of all leaves by the bomb’s shock wave; and yet, despite everything, the trees survived. One tree in Nagasaki was designated a natural monument on February 15, 19th

    Liked by 3 people

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